GREEN, Brian

Brian Green Wool Carting

Inducted into the Shell Rimula Wall of Fame at ReUnion 2005

Brian’s father, Harry Lindsay Green, had brought the first truck out into western NSW in the 1920s, a time when most people were skeptical and didn’t think that these “motorized vehicles” would have any place in the bush. Brian started driving at the age of 14, and completed his first solo trip, carting stock to about 160 kms out of town, at the age of 15.

That was the beginning of a long career in the cab. He and his brother started out in old Fords, only to trade them in for a couple of cab-over Bedfords and a 630 Diamond T in the 1950s.

A couple of years later they moved into F600 Fords and then later onto Deutz 7 series. Brian was predominantly doing stock and wool carting into southwest Queensland and southwestern NSW.  In 1960/61 he and “Brother Gleeson” had the first roadtrain permits issued in NSW. They went from Mungindi to Byrock down to Willanthry Bridge and over to Coburn, SA, in a straight line. Later it was extended from Mungindi up to Mt. Isa. Brian, with Fergus Potter as his guide, took the very first roadtrain over into Cameron’s Corner in 1970 to Linden Station. They had to get some pace up on the clay pan to get over the big sandhill. A dozer was on the next sandhill with a note: “Now you’re over the first, pull yourselves over the second.”

The biggest mob of sheep Brian ever shifted was 24 000 head between Yarran Vale (southwest Qld) and Thurlow Downs (northwest NSW), about 500 kms in distance. Along with the Bowden Bros. and in the midst of drought and thick, choking bulldust, it took them over three weeks. It was hard, tough work.  In the 1970s, Greens Transport moved into White and Kenworth trucks and started doing a lot of long distance, general haulage work to Darwin, Townsville, Melbourne and Sydney.

Many a story can be told of coming over “The Pass” in the dead of winter trying to dodge the RTA inspectors.

Brian’s pride and joy is a Diamond Reo, a little beauty with which he cannot part.