REYNOLDS, Ken

Ken Reynolds Ken's Trucks

Inducted into the Shell Rimula Wall of Fame at ReUnion 2005

At the age of 17. Ken Reynolds decided he wanted a truck. Living at his father’s farm in Colebrook, Tasmania, he trapped rabbits selling the skins to save the £25 he needed as a deposit on a 1929 Chev.  He borrowed the rest from his father and began repaying him by cutting and carting firewood.

After this, Ken carted cement for the Liawenee Canal for the Hydro Electic Commission and hauled for Standard Case Co.  at Huonville carting logs to the mill and case timber from the mill for apple cases.  During the Second World War he hauled timber for ammunition cases in a pair of lend-lease Chevrolets fitted with gas producers.

In 1947 he went to Maydena to cart logs for the Australian Newsprint Mils.  Ken coped well with the heavy demands of the job with the K7 plus two International KR11s but as the mill expanded he had to get larger trucks to keep up.

In 1949 he purchased two Fodens (one was a 6-cyclinder and the other an 8-cylinder), which were both used to cart loads well over 50 tons in tandem.  The gearboxes weren’t suitable and gave him continual problems.  After some research Ken decided to replace them and eventually fitted Mack gearboxes in both the trucks.

Pleased with the performance of the Mack gearboxes, Ken later sold the Fodens and purchased Macks.  His initial Mack fleet in 1951 was made up of three NRs complete with canvas roofs and side curtains.

As the business grew over the years a variety of other Macks were acquired including two Mack A5 1s, two B43s, two B61s, two B61 RSs and later three R600s.

Ken retired in 1978.  His two sons, Roger and Russell, continued to operate the business until their own retirements in 1990.  During this time they kept loyal to the Mack marque owning several 237s, 320s, a 350 Econodyne and a 350 Valueliner all of which were sold with the business.  The Reynolds name lives on in Colebrook, Tasmania.