CRAWFORD, Sidney

08crawfordsidney1 08crawfordsidney2

Inducted into the Shell Rimula Wall of Fame at ReUnion 2008.

Sidney Crawford (SC) was born in Warnambool on November 4th, 1885, and died in Adelaide on May 15th, 1968 at the age of 82.  His first involvement with the motor transport industry was during WW1 when he trained and served in France as a motor transport driver with the Australian Imperial Force.

Following the war, he moved to South Australia and in 1922 formed two companies - Adelaide Motors and All British Motorhouse which primarily sold Austin and Fiat cars.

He was a member of the State's first Transport Control Board, which was formed in 1930.  In 1934, Sidney established Commercial Motor Vehicles (CMV) and served as its managing director until his death.  It was through CMV that he firmly established himself as a leader and key contributor to the growth and development of the Australian road transport industry.  Today Sidney Crawford's legacy continues, with the CMV group currently SA's largest, privately-owned, retail motor group, covering the sales of Toyota cars and commercials, Lexus, Chrysler, Jeep, Dodge, Suzuki as well as DAF, Fuso, Hino, Kenworth, Mack and Volvo trucks.  In 1939 Sidney Crawford published a 138-page guide called 'Hauling for Profit' to assist drivers involved in freight and passenger transport in Australia.  He dedicated the book "to all good transport drivers who are indeed KNIGHTS OF THE ROAD".

During WW11, CMV designed and manufactured Brig Gas Producers as an alternative fuel during petrol rationing.  The company had 40 staff working and fitting the gas producers.  On 1940, SC was instrumental in setting up a Metal Carters Association and helping tip-truck operators and carters negotiate a better deal with the quarry owners who, at the time, were regarded as tough business people.  In December 1998, the Sidney Crawford Gallery was opened at the National Motor Museum.

There is no doubt that Sidney Crawford promoted the development of the SA motor industry right up to his death in 1968.  He would be justifiably proud that his grandchildren and great-grandchildren are keeping the legacy of his philosophies and contributions to the road transport industry alive today.  The company has continued to develop and prosper over 75 years of continuous Crawford management.