PERRY, Roger

09_perry_roger1 09_perry_roger_2

Inducted into the Shell Rimula Wall of Fame at ReUnion 2009.

Roger Perry started in the transport industry at the age of 20 driving a tip-truck.  Six months later he purchased the Bedford tipper, converted it and hauled general freight around Australia in it for about 18 months.

Roger later fitted a stock crate and carted livestock for six years.  In 1968 Roger and wife Helen moved to Portland to tow refrigerated vans carting perishable goods throughout Australia.  He did this for eight years in his pride and joy, a Cummins-powered Atkinson.

In 1974, after Cyclone Tracy, Roger transported many loads of meat and perishables to Darwin.  The road then was mostly dirt, from Port Augusta to Alice Springs.  During this time they also operated a milk bar but sold this when they took over the Golden Fleece Fuel Agency.  This was the beginning of a long association with the fuel industry.  In 1982 Roger and Helen purchased two new trucks and set up a transport business in Horsham.  They had Macks and Fords to start with but gradually changed the fleet to Kenworths, which suited most jobs from 2004 onwards.  The company transported everything from parcels to B-doubles of fuel, general, grain and containers throughout SA, Victoria and NSW.

The fleet was gradually built up to 100 vehicles and a staff of 50.  Roger was very particular about his fleet appearance and roadworthiness.  He also had a very good relationship with depot workers, drivers, and sub-contractors.

He was the first to help the local communities in trouble with free transport of goods on many occasions.  Roger was one of the first to adapt to modern technology and engineering in the transport industry, but he could not grasp computers, preferring pen and paper.  He also loved a joke and a VB.  Roger built his business with guts and determination.  Both of these are attributes which have been passed on to his children, Dean and Jo.

Roger earned a huge amount of respect from business associates and employees and never failed to make lasting friendships wherever he went.

Roger's sudden death, on 20th March 2008, was a great shock to all.