GREGORY, Allan

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Inducted into the Shell Rimula Wall of Fame at ReUnion 2010.

Allan Gregory received his licence 45 years ago by taking the local policeman down to the local butchers to purchase his meat. Allan's first truck was an Albion Chieftain with which he carted briquettes from Yallourn to farms, petrol and oil in 44-gallon drums from Melbourne to Amaco Service Station, Warragul and delivering goods locally to shops in Drouin.

The next truck was an old 'Interigo' carting super bins to farms, followed by a 'Benz truck and trailer carting bulk super and lime from Melbourne, Geelong, Longford and Timboon to farms all over Victoria. Next was the T.K. Bedford carting cement from Geelong to Canberra, then Gypson from Nyah west and Cowangie back to the Cardinia Creek Dam in a Transtar. After that came the G88 Volvo again carting super from Melbourne and Geelong. He also carted potatoes from Iona to Sydney for Smiths chips and returned carrying grain from towns in N.S.W and Victoria to Melbourne.

His next truck was an F12 Volvo with which he carted dirt from Mid Valley Shopping Centre in Morwell. This was followed by a Mazda van in which he carted Flora Pak Plastics to Melbourne for 2 years.

He eventually purchased his own truck (with his wife Robyn) which was a Transtar carting pipes from Melbourne to Gippsland. In 1988 they decided to sell the truck and go to work at the shire for 3 years before returning once more to truck driving working for A.B., L & D Murray for 2½ years driving one of their trucks. Whilst working for Murrays he has travelled all over Victoria, a large area of N.S.W. and Adelaide carting paper, slate, roof tiles and bricks over the last 12 years.

In 2000 he battled cancer. This resulted in having his leg amputated just below the knee but he has since had a prosthetic leg fitted which enables him to continue driving, clocking up 2.2 million kilometers in this truck alone.

All up, while driving trucks, he has covered about 7 million kilometres and continues to drive today.