SPINKS, Robin

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Inducted into the Shell Rimula Wall of Fame at ReUnion 2010.

Robin, affectionately known as “Spinksy,” started his trucking business in the early 1960s. His first truck was an L160 1951 International.  With his truck he made a good living carting wood, hay, wheat and whatever was available. At the time wood was worth $5.00 per ton. Many people could only afford $2.00 though Robin, with his generous nature, never refused or denied any customers.

Robin then progressed to driving interstate. His next truck was a Toyota 6000, and was known as the “Careful Carrier”. He then purchased the ACCO International.  After a few years he bought a Dodge. Robin was never one for a long-nosed truck so he soon upgraded to an Atkinson. He had this truck painted red, white and blue and appropriately named her “Lady Di.” This truck went on for many years predominately doing interstate work and he became known to his mates as “Spinksy”. Close mates and friends he had by the dozen, even the crows and cockatoos were familiar with him.

Robin had made the decision to give up trucking and concentrate on his family (wife, Jackie and daughters Sandra and Kay). They have had many happy years together and Robin is now a very proud grandfather of 4. These grandchildren are the absolute love of his life. 

Robin entered a partnership and did contract harvesting for a few years with 2 class headers 105 and 96. He then decided to purchase the 96 and work for himself for a period of two years.

Robin now has a workshop in his yard, forever the "Good Samaritan" helping his mates out with welding and repairing their machinery. Even the young kids about town would call to have him fix their bikes or to repair a flat tyre. One morning a boy came in pushing a lawn mower, saying “It won’t go and I need to make some money for Christmas, can you help me please?”. Spinksy looked at the mower and asked the boy to “return tomorrow, little mate.”  At 6am the next morning the boy was back to collect his mower. About a week after Christmas the boy returned riding a bike. He said he made $50. “Dad, Mum, my brothers and sisters all got presents and there was enough money left for me to buy a bike. Thanks Spinksy, I won’t forget you.” Robin was left standing with tears streaming down his face. There was one, (and there were countless times) when Robin was required to help a mate repair a chassis. It was midnight and Robin with his generous “help any bugger out” nature worked tirelessly through the night to get his mate back on the road. He never took any payment for the job.

These are just a few recollections of Spinksy and to those who know him, know he is just a hard working, gentle and warm hearted man who can be forever relied upon to help a mate. To his family and those to whom he is closest, he is a legend in his own right. “A Dinky Di Aussie Mate”