OGILVY, Jeffery

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Inducted into the Shell Rimula Wall of Fame at ReUnion 2011.

Jeffrey Ogilvy began his transport career as a driver carting sheep and grain in the mid-north area of South Australia not long after leaving school. He drove a petrol engine International with a two and a half deck sheep crate. This work took him to all parts of SA and into western NSW.

A change of vehicles and companies saw Jeffrey driving a Volvo prime-mover with a triple deck sheep crate and a double deck cattle crate carting stock in all of the southern areas of the country. Jeff was commissioned to carry drought affected stock from western NSW to Peterborough, SA sale yards; a task he did with great care and attention. As a result, during restocking, he undertook many loads back into the area.

Jeffery then changed to a position that would last for nearly the whole of his working life. It was as a driver of Mack prime-movers hauling fuel tankers into the far north of SA, the far eastern desert areas of WA and western QLD and NSW for Parnell Transport Industries.

This involved carting fuel to outback clients including cattle and sheep stations, roadhouses, aboriginal settlements, mining and drilling camps, crusher plants and earth moving camps and graders on the side of the road. Special skeletal tanker trailers designed and built by Parnell Transport Industries were used for this work. Equipped with a complex manifolding system Jeffrey was able on occasions to off load fuel from rail tankers on the newly built railway line and haul to remote outback locations.
Dr. Peter Sweatman from the Australian Road Research Board, Melbourne, worked with Jeffrey in the research into strains and stresses in roadtrains as part of the research into the open use of triple roadtrains in South Australia. This work is portrayed in the film,“The 33rd Wheel”. Jeffrey was the driver of the first approved triple roadtrain to travel from Pt. Augusta, SA to the NT border. After the Stuart Highway was sealed, Jeffrey was still driving Mack prime-movers hauling triple fuel tankers through the area which now included Alice Springs.

Jeffrey maintains his association with the bush and its people even in his retirement today.