NORLEY, Edward

12norleyedwardport 12norleyedwardchev1100b 12norleyedwardcycleseliotsingers

Inducted into the Shell Rimula Wall of Fame at ReUnion 2012.


Edward Norley was in the transport industry all his working life. He drove for Henstridges Edwardstown Bus Service before enlisting for active service during World War Two. On his return from overseas, Edward purchased a 1943 Ford tray truck and rented a depot in Adelaide. A secondhand 1942 Chevrolet was purchased soon after giving Edward a fleet of two trucks. He worked hard to secure work contracts to provide the fledgling company with steady business. Super Elliot’s Cycles was one of these and one of the trucks was soon painted up in Elliot’s livery.

As the business outgrew the premises Edward moved to Kurralta Park where it operated until Edward joined Ken W Thomas (later Thomas Nationwide Transport then TNT). Edward remained with TNT for 23 years until he retired in 1977.

Edward Norley was known as a character and a hard worker who never hesitated to help anyone who was struggling. His motto was,

“What goes round, comes round.” 

A perfect example of this occurred sometime in the 1950s when various carrier stands were set up in Adelaide and the general public could arrange transportation of goods on the spot. Edward was there one day representing the Ken Thomas organisation when a young man approached to arrange transport from the city to a nearby suburb. The client helped load the truck and Edward promptly delivered the young man, his family and furniture to their destination where they unloaded. The cost was, in the old currency, about thirty bob.

As the client went to pay, Edward noticed it was all the money his client had to his name. Edward Norling refused to accept payment saying not to worry about it and that maybe the favour would be returned ‘one day’. Two years later Edward responded to a press notice. The Shell Oil Company of Australia wanted quotes for carrying 44 gallon drums from the Birkenhead depot.

On Thomas Nationwide Transport’s behalf Edward Norley dutifully lined up behind several other applicants, and in turn entered for the interview. He was surprised to be immediately asked to sign a document and told the job was his. The door to an adjoining office opened and the manager walked out and said,

“I owe you 30 bob.”