SCOTT, Ken

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Inducted into the Shell Rimula Wall of Fame at ReUnion 2012.

Ken Scott has been involved in the transport industry for nearly fifty years having started as an offsider with F J Cawte at Murray Bridge when he was just 17 years old. He went on to drive for them delivering local freight in a lendlease Chev and later a Maple Leaf.

In 1969 Ken undertook his first long distance trip from Adelaide to Darwin with Kennelly Transport. He recalls that at first it almost broke his heart as the conditions were very tough in those days. When he returned from that first trip his operations manager, Don McIver, asked where he wanted to go next and his answer was back to Darwin. Brian had very quickly gotten over his initial shock of driving on the dirt and in the following years went on to do a lot more hauling throughout the Northern Territory and northern Western Australia.

Over the years Ken drove for many bosses all over the continent carting mainly general and freezer freight, both express and market, for several iconic companies including Hi-Trans, John Collins and Wilson Transport. In 1995 he worked as a coach captain for Ansett Trailways on the express run from Alice Springs to Coober Pedy, Ayers Rock, Dunmarra and Mt Isa. This lasted for about three years.

In 2012 Ken is employed by Australian Portable Camps (APC) relocating portable camps and general freight into the north of Western Australia, the Northern Territory and northern Queensland. The APC fleet is made up of approximately 30 trucks on the road – primarily Macks, Kenworths and Western Stars. Ken currently drives a Kenworth 908 based out of the depot at Monarto in South Australia.

Ken’s favourite memory of the old days is of sitting around a campfire in the middle of nowhere eating and drinking while spinning yarns and discussing ETAs with his fellow truckies. The bad times were changing tyres, mending punctures and fixing breakdowns, all on his own in the middle of nowhere, which was necessary if he was to make his way home.

Today Ken considers that the modern truckies and companies lack the respect and support for each other that, to the old fellows in the industry, was so very important.


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