HARRINGTON, Cary

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Inducted into the Shell Rimula Wall of Fame at ReUnion 2013.

Cary John (Kerro) Harrington was born in Sydney on 17 March 1943 and was always destined for a career as a truck driver. Cary’s interest in trucks began at a young age and his first job as a teen in the late 1950’s was at Dawling Bros (Sydney) as a spray painter. In 1960 he joined the army in the Artillery Unit carting guns for two years which honed his driving skills.

In 1972 Cary began working for Caltex driving a fuel tanker – and this was where he found many life-long friends that he talked fondly of until the day he died. Cary stayed with Caltex until mid 1980’s after which he decided to go into business for himself as an owner/driver. He purchased his own tipper and began transporting asphalt as a contractor out of Boral working alongside his best mate, Peter McLachlan.
 
Ever adaptable and flexible, Cary then moved into the passenger freight business and onto the buses. One of his proudest career moments was being part of the driving fleet for the Sydney 2000 Olympics.  He was honoured to wear the Olympics uniform – and it was in this uniform that he was buried on 28 October 2011.

Cary saw out his later years working for Chemtrans in Sydney’s south-west, transporting ethanol and various chemicals. It was a job he loved, and a company he greatly respected. He continued on at Chemtrans until he could physically work no longer and eventually retired in 2010. Cary had a very strong work ethic and he instilled this belief into his three sons. His eldest son is self-employed and two are both B-Double drivers themselves.

Cary Harrington was a born truck driver, he did not yearn for any other job, and dedicated his whole life to a career on the road. He counted some of his best mates as truckies and valued his profession very highly. He is remembered as a gentleman of the road and one of this industry’s greatest amabassadors. 

Rest In Peace Kerro.