SYMES, Neville "Boney"

Neville Bryce Symes 'Boney' was born at the Memorial Hospital, North Adelaide in 1951. He is married to Maxine and has two children Vanessa and Andrew.

Neville grew up on the family farm at Mallala and in 1968 began his working career in the transport industry driving a Dodge Fargo and an International Acco delivering wheat and flour for the Salisbury Flour Mill. Neville is still driving trucks 48 years later.

Neville has driven for a number of trucking companies over the years hence he has driven many different makes of trucks and buses including 1418 Mercedes Benz, Eagle and Domino buses, Isuzu, International S Line and Transtar, Volvo Freightliners, Mack and Kenworth. There wouldn't be too many makes of trucks that Neville hasn't driven.

As far as roads travelled, Neville has driven all over Australia to all mainland capitals and to numerous outback destinations through the centre of Australia. The outback trips are still Neville's preferred trips.

Boney has carried various loads including general freight, wool, beer and wine, newspapers, bitumen tankers and fuel. His most controversial was when he was involved in the first shipment of uranium from Roxby Downs to Port Adelaide. The convoy had a police escort the whole way and had to deal with protestors and the media covering the story.

Another memory for Neville was when he was driving for Scott's Transport and he had the privilege of driving the first B Double fuel tanker in South Australia.

Neville is currently employed by Rail Road carting fuel and general freight locally and interstate.

Neville has been an absolute dedicated servant to the transport industry, he takes pride in his job and the presentation of the trucks he drives. He has an excellent reputation as a driver and also upholds the reputation of the hard working transport industry that it so deserves.

Over the 48 years driving Boney has made many life long friends in the transport industry. Neville says the camaraderie and stories they have to tell will never be forgotten.